Sailing away with Nikk and Jan

Archive for the ‘Living in Mexico’ Category

Tortugas Bebes de Tenecatita(Baby Turtles of Tenecatita)

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Playa Tenecatita With Brown Pelicans and Magnificent Frigatebirds

In December 2016 Nikk and I again sailed south about 120 miles to Tenecatita, a lovely bay and anchorage where many cruisers gather in winter.  In the previous two blogs there are numerous details of the adventures awaiting the cruisers and shore folk who visit this area.

After anchoring Balance in a protected little corner of the bay with about six other boats, we paddled our kayaks to shore, and gratefully landed with no mayhem.  While Nikk played bocce ball on the beach I walked down to the Blue Bay Hotel area with several of the women and went to investigate the Turtle Sanctuary.  There in a concrete holding tank were 23 baby turtles, just hatched from their eggs, some with the membrane still attached, awaiting their release to the ocean, which we were told would occur at 6 pm that night.  With excitement I hurried back to tell Nikk and we agreed to stay on shore and wait the three hours until release time.

 

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These are probably Olive Ridley sea turtles

Mexico has six of the seven endangered species of turtles, and Mexico is at the forefront of turtle conservation.  This is just in time, because turtle meat and turtle eggs have been a source of food and income for centuries in Mexico.  When the military was occupied in Chiapas with the rebels some years ago, hundreds of thousands of turtle eggs were looted from beaches that had formerly been protected by the military.  Now the government is promoting agroforestry and chicken farms to provide eggs to replace the need for turtles.

Turtles come back to the beach where they were hatched years before to lay their eggs, after swimming thousands of miles to feed and then mate.  In that time they face predators, including humans, and being trapped as a byproduct of fishing boats with huge nets.  I read that recently many of the huge fishing boats have started using nets which release turtles and dolphins.  Still, of 1000 baby turtles that manage to make it to the ocean, only 1-3 are estimated to return to their beach to lay eggs.  In the Marina Riviera Nayarit  in La Cruz, I have seen several large  adult Green Turtles swimming inside the marina, looking for the beach that was there before the marina was begun in 2006.  I don’t know what they can do when they can’t find their beach.

 

Playa Tenecatita at the Blue Bay Hotel is one of several turtle conservation beaches along the Costalegre, the area of beaches in the state of Jalisco stretching from Puerto Vallarta to  Tenecatita, and then to Manzanillo in Colima state.  Four of the six species in Mexico are found here.  We often see huge turtles swimming along while we sail, sometimes we even see them mating.  The turtle conservators, who are paid by the Mexican government, collect the eggs (up to 200!) when they are laid and place them in the sand inside a pen that is guarded 24 hours a day.  A sign is erected and placed above the buried eggs, giving date of laying, number of eggs, and then later the date of hatching and how many baby turtles are successfully hatched.  The actual hatching is called a “frenzy”, which makes  me suspect that the turtles hatch all at once from their clutch.

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The sign says that there are 60 nidos (nests) and 113 eggs?

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Los Angeles Locos is the local turtle protection group

 

At 6 pm many people, young and old, gathered in excited groups at the concrete pen containing the baby turtles.  Luckily for us some of the people were vacationing from the U.S., spoke both English and Spanish, and were happy to translate the instructions and information.

 

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Two guards gathered the turtles into buckets and began to walk to the water’s edge with the humans following, eagerly awaiting what we assumed would be the guards releasing the turtles near the surf.

 

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When we arrived at the edge of the beach we were very surprised to have the guards line us up in an open rectangle and begin giving us the baby turtles to hold.  The baby turtles flailed their flippers vigorously, making them hard to keep aloft.

 

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Seeing the looks of rapt attention and the care that the children showed for the baby turtles gave me an upwelling of grateful emotions.

 

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The turtles felt cool and their shells were hard.

 

Soon it was time to lower the turtles carefully onto the sand, and they scrabbled  themselves slowly towards the surf.  There was a lot of cheering from the sidelines as one by one the baby turtles met the waves and were carried out into the bay.  Sometimes it took several waves before one big enough to carry the turtle away arrived.  The turtles were released at sunset when the pelicans and other birds were back at their nightly roosts, to avoid the pelicans snacking on the baby turtles like they do  in Puerto Vallarta when the release takes place in the late afternoon.

 

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“Goodbye little turtle”, we said, “live long and prosper on your journeys far and wide”.

With happy hearts we walked back down the beach to the kayaks, being grateful to all the caring Mexicans who help restore and conserve the turtle populations of the Costalegre, including all the people who came to the beach to participate.  The joy in our hearts was echoed by the warmth of the deep red sunset.

 

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Several sites with information about participating in turtle rescue are here:

https://www.mexperience.com/outdoors

http://www.puertovallartatours.net/baby-sea-turtles

 

 

 

 

 

 

Six Months in Mexico Come to an End

On the last day of April I sit in the rather chilly VIP Lounge here at Marina Riviera Nayarit in La Cruz de Huanacaxtle, reflecting on the past six months, and especially the past month here in Mexico. Foggy brain syndrome due to the past six nights of gigantic explosions at sunset, 11 pm, 5am and 7am is plaguing me right now. It is due to The Days of La Cruz, nine days of parades, entertainment on the stage next to the plaza, and an excuse for horrific amounts of Bang, Bang, Boom. If someone had PTSD they would need to get out of La Cruz for these nine days! I am avoiding anyplace that might have explosions, so there are no pictures of the festivities.

Luckily most of April was calm, but busy. Yoga many mornings for me, Nikk listening to the Cruiser’s Net each day at 8:30am, Spanish class Tuesdays and Thursdays for me, then meeting friends for potluck dinners, nights out at local restaurants, and a lot of saying goodbye to our friends sailing off north, south and west, or flying back “home”.

Birdwatching took on new meaning when I stayed at Punta Esmerelda in an upscale condo with my friend Zoe while she was “parrot-sitting”.

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Izzy the African Grey Parrot and Rudy the green Australian parrot got cozy with us (sometimes a bit too cozy, when the big yellow beak was only cm away from Nikk’s ear). African Grey Parrots are celebrated for their intelligence and speaking/singing ability. When Zoe sang opera, Izzy tried to duet. Of course we had to closely monitor our speech, to avoid having the owners come back to a bird with a startling new vocabulary. The most recently-famous African Grey Parrot was Alex, trained by Dr. Irene Pepperberg. www.nytimes.com/2008/11/09/books/review/Royte-t.html

Have you heard the saying “I’d rather have a palapa in Yelapa than a condo in Redondo.”? We sailed across the Bay of Banderas twice in April to investigate the Yelapa scene, once with visiting friends Bruce and Maureen, once on the annual trip to celebrate a friend’s birthday.

On the trail to a waterfall three miles away we found a palapa, perhaps not exactly what the creator of the saying had in mind, but perfect for someone to escape the SoCal scene.

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Nikk hiked this same trail up the river to the waterfall 30 years ago, and what a change he found. Many new concrete block homes, some hippie palapas, some Mexican homes built on stilts with homemade furniture from local woods. Finally the last mile meandered through the tropical trees without any abodes, and we came to the waterfall flowing over polished granite.

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The pool below the waterfall looked way too muddy, so we climbed the slick rocks by the waterfall and found a perfect pool above the falls. Since no one else climbed after us we stripped and bobbed in the cool water, being careful not to get swept over the falls.

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The other waterfall in Yelapa is a short but steep hike up through town. Along the way there you can stop to catch your breath and look out over the little deep blue bay with Balance anchored among the fishing pangas.

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This waterfall is visited by hundreds of tourists per day, yet still conveys peace, solitude and even romance from the right angle.

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Six boats sailed over to Yelapa from La Cruz for the birthday bash. To get to the restaurant we anchored with a mooring ball, paid the panguero 200 pesos (about 13 US dollars) for the mooring ball and rides to and from the boat, gathered for drinks at the beachside palapa, hiked up the beach, waded across the fairly shallow river, hiked up some steep steps between homes, across a bridge, and arrived at Gloria’s Restaurant. The seafood was fabulous, fish in garlic and butter sauce, with rice and salad, shrimp, octopus, and oysters cooked numerous ways. Then Mike’s cake arrived, with candles, whipped cream, and a little caballito, a small, skinny glass full of tequila in the center. The Mexican birthday cake tradition is to take the first bite using no hands or implements. Mike removed the little shot glass and complied. Somehow some of the frosting got transferred to Katrina. The picture is a little blurry because we were all laughing so riotously.

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Back in La Cruz, Earth Day began with a bird watching tour where we found 38 species just by walking near the marina, through the town, and down the beach. After the bird watch we joined a beach cleanup, with many cruising families filling up huge trash bags. That night Katrina the marina PR organizer arranged a bonfire with music to thank everyone.

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Friday the 24th was the last Science Friday for the season, so we exploded zip lock bags by mixing vinegar and baking soda. The baking soda was wrapped in a paper towel to slow the mixing and production of carbon dioxide gas, which allowed the kids to pass the bag around like a hot potato until it exploded. We also made giant soap bubbles with a special recipe I found on the Internet. www.happyhooligans.ca/homemade-giant-bubbles

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We fly back to Portland next Tuesday, and until then the days will be filled with the work needed to leave Balance here for the next six months.
Instead of boring you with those details I’ll leave you with a shot of our dock taken from the third story La Pezka restaurant, where we just might have dinner tonight.

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Appreciation of Beauty and Excellence

As some of you know, I have another blog where I post to the WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge.
For those of you interested, it’s http://www.curiositycafe.wordpress.com. A site called 61 Musings “liked” my recent post, and I went to see what they had posted. What luck, it’s a wonderful site with musings on introversion. I learned a lot, and I am definitely in an introverted state of mind at present, I call it my “hermit phase”. The site had a link to another site, with a Character Strength quiz, http://www.viame.org.
Many fellow introverts scored highest with Appreciation of Beauty and Excellence, as I did. The natural world is a constant source of inspiration and connection for me, as is art, music and writing. So here are some images from the past six weeks since I returned to La Cruz from Portland.

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A broad-billed hummingbird with two baby birds in the nest

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Koi at the Vallarta Botanical Gardens

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Two gringos cooling off in the river at Vallarta Botanical Gardens

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Four-foot long Green Iguana in a tree at the marina

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Peg admiring the local “art” at Ana Banana’s Restaurant

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The Happy Girls, happy because we’re in Mexico on the beach

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A fisherman returning in his panga right before the full moon came up

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The Full Moon from the marina Mar. 16, looking across the anchorage to Bucerias.

Tomorrow we leave for a week-long adventure to visit Copper Canyon in Chihuahua, a canyon deeper than the Grand Canyon, home to the reclusive Tarahumara Indians, two bus rides and a spectacular train ride away from La Cruz. With luck we will come back with pictures and many stories to share.

WXYZ: Witches, Xocolatl, Yelapa, and Zoology

Witchy Woman scared a few kids and maybe grownups too in La Cruz on Halloween night. About a hundred kids showed up at Philo’s to get candy from the patrons. Nikk and I were two of four winners of the costume contest, my thanks to Allison for painting my face and loaning me a costume!

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Philo said that Nikk wasn’t really wearing a costume, since he dresses like that every day.

The kids were adorable.

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I could (and might) do a whole post for the blog about the restaurants of La Cruz, but I’ll just mention four. First is Xocolatl, located on a hill above the town, with the best view of the bay and the marina. By the time you’ve hiked up from the marina, and then climbed about a hundred steps, you’re really ready for food. Xocolatl provides huge platters of seafood or traditional Mexican dishes and we’ve always been too full to sample any desserts. Back in town, Philo’s serves pizzas, spaghetti, and on Tuesday’s Nikk’s favorite, all-you-can-eat-ribs with coleslaw and baked beans. Just a few doors down from Philo’s is Los Sillas Rojas (The Red Chairs), named for the red plastic tables and chairs set out in the street. I absolutely love their quesadilla, with beans, onions, cilantro, four different sauces, and a little plate of radishes and limes, and only 30 pesos, about $2.20 US. Finally, for breakfast once or twice a week we head over to Ana Banana’s to visit with other folks who live in La Cruz, on boats or in condos or homes. The breakfast enchiladas are sometimes really spicy, but delicious. These are some of the restaurants that we will miss, and I’ll mention one more that just opened, Gecko Rojo, where we’ve had clam chowder, chinese food, and fish and chips, something different is served each night.

Ana Banana’s hosted The Day of the Dead holiday ceremony Nov. 2. This is a Mexican holiday, Nov. 1 the Mexicans honor children that have passed, and Nov. 2 is dedicated to adults. One corner of the restaurant had a huge altar that stretched out along the floor in front, with pictures, flowers, foods or items that the deceased friends or relatives liked while they were alive, and lots of candles. There was a ceremony remembering and blessing the ones who are no longer with us, then a performance by a local troop of young people dancing traditional Mexican dances.
Many people have their faces painted to look like the Katrinas.

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Ana Banana’s has another tradition I discovered the second time I ate there. I asked about the Seagram’s bags hanging from the rafters and was told they contained the ashes of former relatives and friends, especially friends who spent a lot of time hanging out at Ana Banana’s. I was shocked speechless. Now I understand that it is a way to honor and remember the ones who have passed on, but then all I could think of was the fact I was sitting and eating my enchiladas underneath the remnants of a corpse.

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On a cheerier note, Nov. 7 we took a party boat from Nuevo Vallarta to Yelapa and back. Nikk won this trip last July in a raffle, about two days after we returned from celebrating Nikk’s birthday in Yelapa. It was a really fun Vallarta Adventures trip, with a stop to snorkel and kayak in some clear waters, then on to Yelapa, a small isolated village on the southern shore of the Bay of Banderas, that caters to tourists. From our guide, Davd, we learned local history, botany and zoology as we walked up and up through the town to the waterfall high above.
It had just rained, so the water was a shade of brownish-orange, and a lot of people on the trip swam.

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Back down through the jungle we hiked, across a muddy, shallow river (luckily there are no piranhas here), and plopped ourselves down on beach chairs to have drinks and be solicited by local vendors. I did buy a bracelet of green stones from Miguelito, who has eight children, several of them are studying at the university at Puerto Vallarta (at least I think that’s what he said).

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I should mention that on the way back to Nuevo Vallarta, part of the crew dressed up in long wigs and seventies rock costumes, then entertained us out on the deck with rock and roll oldies until we ran into a rain squall. Good food, beautiful scenery, all the drinks we could drink, and a friendly bunch of crew and passengers made it a great trip.

Now for the rest of the zoology in the title. Turtles returned to the marina right before we left and swam around in the marina, sometimes for days. I am wondering if these turtles were hatched in La Cruz before the marina was built in 2007, and have returned, looking for the sands they came from. Several rescue organizations exist here in the bay that collect the eggs laid by the turtles, then when they hatch, protect them as they slowly crawl to the water.

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Today, Nov. 11, we’re anchored once again in Punta de Mita, but with almost no other boats. The weather has turned, the monsoon season seems to be over (although it’s still 90 degrees during the day, but cooling down into the mid-70’s at night, which is a LOT cooler than 82 or 83) and we are ready to sail down south tomorrow to Ipala, terra incognita for us. We paddled in to grab some drinks and guacamole at a beach palapa restaurant, Coral, and were serenaded by chortling Great-tailed Grackles perching at the next table.

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Nikk is ready to jump naked into the water and clean off the propeller so the knot log will work tomorrow, and I’m ready to make marlin tacos with salad for dinner, and watch the sun go down.

Just a Note Before We Go

Nikk and I are back on Balance in the Marina Riviera Nayarit, after living in a house here in La Cruz for four months, and taking care of two cats and too many plants in pots. We do miss the air conditioning, here in La Cruz in October the sun is still high in the sky, and the temperatures in the afternoon, when the sun beats down most mercilessly, are in the low nineties but feel like one hundred degrees. I’m writing this in the air conditioned marina lounge, where all the cruisers without air conditioning, like us, hang out in the afternoon to read, work, chat, and sleep. Yesterday at five I tried another way to cool off and met a friend to take a dip in the bay at the little beach right here by the marina. We waded into 95-degree water, with two or three foot swells that lifted us right off the sandy/rocky bottom. The wave action stirred up the sand so much that we couldn’t see our feet on the bottom, but when we swam around with our masks and snorkels we were immersed in swirling gold mica flecks from the sand.

It seems like the monsoonal weather is now over, the last big storm was about two weeks ago. While we walked to dinner the air was sizzling, right before the simultaneous crack and boom of the lightning and thunder, then the skies cut loose with a downpour. The open-air restaurant was soon flooded, luckily the palapa roof of thatch kept the water off our heads, so we ate with our feet propped up away from the inch of water on the floor, and watched the beauty of the storm.
Here are some pictures of the monsoon in September.

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For nine months of the year this is a dry riverbed that we walk up to go birdwatching.

Even though La Cruz didn’t get any huge thunderstorms like they had three years ago when it rained 30 inches in five days, all that water picked up a lot of debris; trees, branches, fence posts with barbed wire, and a lot of plastic and styrofoam, which then flowed out into the bay and washed up on the beaches. Some of us here at the marina picked up bags of plastic litter on the beach one morning, to prevent it from going back into the water. The pool at the house would overflow all over the deck from all the rain, and unfortunately, even though the house was only five years old, the ceiling would leak. The worst leak was right over the stove.

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Here I am trying to cook while holding a tupperware bowl to catch the leaks.

One day at the house I kept hearing a strange sound, almost like a tap tap tapping. No, it wasn’t a raven (think Edgar Allen Poe here), finally I found the source, a Yellow Warbler attacking its reflection in the kitchen window. The strange thing was that it was a female, the males have orange streaks on their breasts, and it had no streaks. She persisted for several hours, and a Golden-Cheeked Woodpecker came by to watch her for a while, maybe it was thinking she was pecking at a meal of tasty grubs?

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For birdwatching news, besides the Yellow Warbler, we’ve seen a Blue-black Grassquit, immature Grey Hawk, Golden Vireo, and a flock of Black-throated Magpie Jays. Even though we’ve seen these jays many times, it’s hard to believe that they can fly with their two-foot long tails.

Now that the clouds have given way to sunny days, we have taken two sailing trips out to the Tres Mariettas, islands at the mouth of the Bay of Banderas near Punta de Mita. On the first trip we were joined by a fabulous group of Estonian women, one woman, Crystal, lives here, and the others came on vacation. At one spot where we anchored, it’s possible to snorkel over to the rocky shore, watch the wildly-colored fish in the rocks, then swim underneath a rocky opening and into a hidden beach. Nikk took Sophie, who was six years old, in through the opening in our kayak, she laid prone in the kayak, and Nikk pushed her through. She was really brave! The Estonian women were such delightful companions.

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Every week for the past five weeks I’ve been meeting with two boys, ages 11 and 8, and their mother, and doing chemistry. They live on a boat and are home-schooled, and are so excited to do chemistry. We’ve done bottle rockets, made indicators and tested acids and bases, dissolved pennies in hydrochloric acid, made hydrogen gas and exploded it, dipped a dollar bill in rubbing alcohol, lit it, and saw it survive, cleaned tarnished silver with a hot solution of baking soda in a pan with aluminum foil, and much more. Alison has been trading Reiki treatments for my back and shoulders, so I’ve been getting tuned up and unloosened.

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Here they’re mixing corn starch and water, it feels solid, and then it turns into goop, and back again.

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Getting ready to ignite a bill dipped in rubbing alcohol.

Now we’re getting the boat ready for another journey. Next week will be time for a trip to Costco and some local stores, storing provisions and water, then celebrating Halloween here at the marina, and two Days of the Dead Nov. 1 and 2, the first day for departed children, the second for departed adults. Many of the restaurants here will have altars for displaying pictures of departed loved ones. One restaurant here, Anna Banana’s, has bags of cremated ashes of the former patrons hanging from the ceiling. A bit of a shock when we were first here and found out what the bags were. We are going to do two or three short trips to locations here in the Bay of Banderas, then head south for a couple of months. We’ll be anchoring at some remote beaches, exploring, and winding up at Barra de Navidad where we’ll be joined by Rob and Stephi on Red Witch II. They have been up in the Sea of Cortez all summer and I am really looking forward to seeing them again. And at the end of December I fly to Portland to spend January helping Deva with the boys and the new baby girl, who is due Dec. 14. For now, we’re enjoying the music and food of La Cruz, and hanging out with our friends here until we again sail away.

Clouds

Bows and flows of angel hair
And ice cream castles in the air
And feather canyons everywhere
I’ve looked at clouds that way

Joni Mitchell “Both Sides Now”

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Cloud art and cloud poetry with a rainbow (can you find it?)

That huge cloud is a cumulonimbus, from the Latin cumulo (heap) and nimbus (rainstorm). They are associated with atmospheric instability, as warm and cold air collide.
Looking at the beauty of this cloud, it would be easy to forget that inside is a maelstrom of air currents being thrust upwards, cold air causing water vapor to condense and increase the cloud size, swirling gusts, and tops that go from 20,000 feet to occasional 70,000 foot monsters. In nature exists beauty and chaos together. After sunset the clouds begin the nightly light show, with lightening bolts sometimes blasting out of clouds in a 360 degree circle all around us. Last year two boats were struck by lightening in the marina, luckily none this year.
Down here it’s still the monsoon season, and hurricane season, although after a few hurricanes off the west coast of Mexico in July, I think August was pretty quiet, and then last week a tropical storm hit the Baja Peninsula, far away. We can get two inches of rain in two hours here, as we did two nights ago, and fantastic displays of lightening. Last night I was up until a little after midnight, enjoying the quiet (we are staying on a cobblestone street that is very busy during the day, with advertisements blaring from trucks, loud music from cars, lots of teenagers going to and from the schools across the street, and all the vehicles bouncing over the speed bump right outside the house). I happened to look out to the north and saw gigantic flashes of lightening in the clouds, with the occasional thunderbolts shooting out into view. And then twice there was a ball of lightening moving from left to right. Was I seeing a lightening bolt head on? So much electricity that it got together and made a ball instead of a bolt? Mysterious.

We’ve been looking at clouds this past week, enjoying a break from the oppressive heat and humidity. The humidity is still there, but when the temperatures are ten to fifteen degrees cooler (F)
the relief is significant. When we returned from two weeks in the Pacific Northwest we thought that we’d be suffering and sweating buckets, but luckily the temperatures over 90 waited a week to appear. Today the sun is out, the temperature here will be 93 degrees, and apparent temperature 103, due to the 85% humidity. I’m in the dining room, with the air conditioner on, and it’s a comfortable 84 degrees. One of the reasons that it’s been two months since I wrote a blog is the heat and humidity. My brain cells go into sloth mode when it’s this hot and humid. The soaking pool is heaven, it’s about 88 degrees and cools our core temperatures back to normal, but after that it’s time to read or nap. I think I’ve read about thirty books this summer!

The first two months here we were only using the air conditioner in the bedroom at night to avoid lying in a puddle of sweat while trying to sleep. Then the electricity bills suddenly went from $900 pesos (about $75 dollars US) to $90 pesos. The solar panels that Dick and Mary Ann put up on the palapa roof were sending excess electricity to the grid, and the electrical company started giving credit. This month the bill was $45 pesos, so we are using the air conditioner in the dining room during the day which is so lovely, and allows me to “do my homework” for the Writer’s Group which meets on Saturday at the marina.

There is still morning yoga at the marina at 8am, and two days a week Stretch Dance in the Ocean (Bay of Banderas) at 10am. Crystal leads the Stretch Dance class, she is a wonderful, powerfully positive woman that I was lucky to meet here this summer. Those of you on FB, go to my page and you can see some beautiful, fun pictures of the class. Nikk and I are also going to the marina at night to feed the three marina cats. One was abandoned last winter, the other two Siamese were abandoned about two years ago at the marina when they were part of a litter of four kittens.
The veterinarian here in town is Dr. Dunia, so one female Siamese was named after her when she spayed and neutered the kittens and the abandoned adult cat.

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This is Dunia, she is beautiful, and loves to be petted. We heard rumors in May when we took over feeding the two marina cats, the Siamese and the Grey Tabby, that there was another Siamese in the marina, the brother of Dunia. Sure enough, after a couple of weeks we were feeding Dunia one night on the steps leading to the boat ramp, and suddenly there was another Siamese slinking alongside the wall about fifteen feet away. We left him a little pile of food. By August he decided that he wanted to be fed, and started running along with us as we walked up to the malecon (the paved, bricked walkway on the top of the berm). He hasn’t gotten close enough to be petted, and probably never will, but last night he was only two feet away from me as I put down his food. Chulita, the Grey Tabby, is very friendly and sweet, and loves to be petted. I am hoping that someone will adopt her this winter when the cruisers and sun-seekers who own or rent homes here return. The cats all hunt lizards and rodents in the rocks, too. And one night while we were feeding the two Siamese cats, a small raccoon appeared.

The big change at the marina is the closure of the restaurant and the store at the beginning of August. Now all the cruisers have to go up into town to eat, buy beer, pop and snacks, get returnable ten gallon bottles of filtered water, and there is no longer a place with umbrellas and tables outside the tienda where we often met our fellow cruisers in the morning to chat. The waiters and waitresses and clerks all lost their jobs, which made us sad. The restaurant and tienda are owned by a time share company, not the marina, so their profit margin must have been suffering in some way, and now lots of workers are suffering. However, several of the waiters were hired as marina guards. One of the live-aboards, Lynn on La Vita, wanted to help a lovely waitress named Marisol, so she organized a Sunday morning opportunity for Marisol to come to our house and do some barbering on four sailors, then manicure Lynn and Jan. Nikk’s hair had been growing for about five months, and was curling behind his ears when she took the electric clipper and shears to it.

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That’s all the news from La Cruz for now. Here’s one more beautiful view of sunset clouds from the rooftop, the “cloud illusions”.

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